By any other name…

“Are you a shaman, Ben?”

The question came from one of the members of the group who’d gathered at a new studio for a dedication ceremony I’d been asked to officiate. We’d prayed together, smoked together, shared a cup of mead, and offered our thanks and best wishes to our hosts. It was a multi-traditional ceremony which, like so many others I’ve attended, started with a simple idea and wove itself into a tapestry of faith, love, and Spirit.

“I never use that title in reference to myself,” I answered. “Some people in my community have called me that, but I prefer to think of myself as Spirit’s roadie. I show up, put out what I’m asked to, let Spirit do His thing, and then pack up everything and leave when the work is done.”

Perhaps my answer might have seemed a bit flippant. And maybe it might not have sat well with some Elders. At this point I have no way of knowing that. All I know is that I cannot claim title over any of the healing or curing that might take place beneath my hands. I’m  simply a man who does his best to serve as a vessel for Spirit’s love…nothing more and nothing less.

I know that there are many who would look at my initial training in Michael Harner’s Core Shamanic method and classify my work as cultural poaching or “Neoshamanism”.

And this is exactly where the difficulty of a modern healing path presents itself. To truly be a vessel of Spirit, one must walk beyond the opinions of men and embrace completely the will of the Creator. Yet one must also serve one’s fellow man, honor fully the traditions that make this possible, and remember always the Elders who’ve lived and died to keep these traditions alive, and the cultures from which they have sprung.

So how does one honor a form without becoming restricted by it? I’m paraphrasing here a bit, but as a teacher of mine once put it, “What kind of healer would I be if you came up to me one day asking me to pray for your wife because she was sick, and I told you I couldn’t because I didn’t have my drum?”

I’ve tossed this issue back and forth a lot over the last couple of years and with the help of my current teacher, I‘ve come to believe that the answer lies in acknowledgement, permission, and gratitude.

When we are called to serve, we must first acknowledge and accept our responsibility to those who’ve come to us, to the Creator, and to All Our Relations. Then, with full permission of all parties involved, we open ourselves to the Will of the Creator and gratefully allow His healing light to flow through us for the greatest good of all. Whether that healing manifests itself through song, rattle, drum, dance, or smoke is immaterial – the form often changes according to the needs of the patient.

This does not mean that we “do whatever we feel like at the moment.” That is a reckless path that leaves us open to the possibility of some very hard lessons. No. What we must do, however, is place ourselves completely in Spirit’s hands, knowing that once there, “WE” aren’t the ones making the decisions. “WE” are simply the conduit through which Spirit’s will is made manifest.

Our main responsibility lies in recognizing the difference between the two. . .

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2 Responses to “By any other name…”

  1. Ben, this is a marvelous post. Traditionally one might say, My teachers were shamans. I like Spirit Roadie just fine though. I have no qualms about your work, none at all. Someone will, of course. It is inevitable. Best to walk on doing the work of spirit and let folks bicker as they will. Blessings on you and yours.

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  2. Thank you, Michael. As always, I value your input. I guess none of us ended up on this path for the distinct purpose of pleasing everyone. (Some days, it’s quite the opposite!) Still, I agree with what you say. All one can do is soldier on and keep things clear between one’s self and Spirit.

    Much light and many blessings to you and your family.

    Stay warm!

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